MUTIRACIAL - MULTICULTURAL FOCUSED ADVOCACY

                            MELANIC FOCUSED EDUCATIONAL ADVOCACY

 NSEAI is a recognized leader and authority for providing practical solutions to today’s special education problems by collaborating with other organizations in the Education, Behavioral, Medical, Social Service and Legal disciplines.  We focus on influencing the development of professional education advocates so to ensure the use of positive solutions to address the challenges that impact all students with special education needs.  NSEAI trains and credentials professional education advocates skilled in achieving positive functional outcomes that address the unique needs of students with learning differences.

NSEAI believes that access to appropriate education is the civil rights issue of our time.  This includes discrimination in disciplinary policies that have created the school-to-prison pipeline, and refusal to identify students in need of special education services, or provide appropriate remediation services.   Education advocates must be trained to address the specific cultural needs of Melanic1 communities.  Each student must have their specific educational needs addressed in the context of their unique ethnic and cultural beliefs and perceptions.

We provide a professional board certification in educational advocacy and training to parents, advocates, educators and other professionals.  We have a focused goal to also have a positive impact upon the Multiracial, Multicultural (Melanic) Students in the educational system through the development of:

  1. Advocacy Skills —specific competencies unique to Melanic educational advocacy

  2. Need Identification – identification of areas of educational need, unique to Melanic populations

  3. Cultural Awareness — competencies in Melanic cultural awareness and familiarity with the significant social problems that affect these communities

  4. Outcome Focused - educational advocacy that focuses on and measures the student’s improved functional outcomes vs. just the legal sufficiency of the IEP or passing grades.  We focus on identifying the individualized needs that prevents the student from accessing their education and the Specially Designed Instruction, Related Services and the Supports to School Personal necessary to move that Melanic student toward meaningful progress.

 

Unique areas of need that must be addressed when advocating for a Melanic student and their family are:

  • Identification of current social and institutional forms of racism

    • Forms of disenfranchisement

    • Institutional lack of cultural awareness

  • Continued exposure to negative stereotypes and beliefs

    • Lack of presumed competency

    • Stereotypes based on language and social skills

  • High levels of traumatizization

    • PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder)

      • Ongoing re-experiencing of racism

      • Ongoing re-experiencing the effects of PTSlaveryD2

      • Resulting in impaired ability to capitalize on their knowledge and learning

    • Violence

      • Students with disabilities (served by IDEA) represent 12% of students with 58% of those placed in seclusion or involuntary confinement.  75% of those placed in seclusion or involuntary confinement were physically restrained at school

      • Black students represent 19% of students with disabilities (served by IDEA), but represent 36% of students restrained at school.

    • The school to prison pipeline exists due to the educational institutional practices of:

      • Zero tolerance - criminalizing minor infractions of school rules

        • Black students represent 27% of those referred to law enforcement

        • Black students represent 31% of those subject to school arrests

        • 70% of those involved in school arrests are Black or Latino and the majority is for zero tolerance policies

      • Use of police in schools (school resource officers) vs the use of behavior specialist, as related service providers

      • Use of criminal justice disciplinary policies being used in schools vs. research based behavioral interventions

      • Use of mass incarceration vs. restorative justice practices

        • The US is 5% of the world population and has 25% of the world’s prisoners

        • Melanics represent 60% of the prison population yet only 29% of the our population

        • Mass incarcerations contribute to the disintegration of family structure

      • 85 percent of juveniles who interface with the juvenile court system are functionally illiterate.

      • 60 percent of all prison inmates are functionally illiterate

      • 2/3 of students who cannot read proficiently by the end of 4th grade will end up in jail or on welfare

      • Illiterate girls in poverty are 6 times more likely to have children out of wedlock than their reading peers

      • If not reading proficiently by the 4th grade there is a 78% chance that they will not catch up with their peers

      • Penal institution records show that only 16% of inmates return to prison if they receive literacy help, as opposed to a 70% return if they receive no help.

      • The Department of Justice states, "The link between academic failure and delinquency, violence, and crime is welded in reading failure.”

      • Over 70% of inmates in prison cannot read above a fourth grade level.

    • Use of exclusionary discipline policies

      • Research shows that suspensions lead to expulsions

      • 5% of white students are suspended yet 16% of black students are suspended

      • Dropping out of school results in 8x higher incidence of incarceration

      • 90% of welfare recipients are high school dropouts

      • Blacks are 3.5 times more likely to be suspended than whites

      • Black and Latino students are 2 times more likely to not graduate than white students

      • 50% of all males in state and federal prison do not have a high school diploma

      • One out of four Melanic boys—and nearly one in five Melanic girls with disabilities (served by IDEA)—receives an out of school suspension.

  • Survival mode existence—a lack of basic needs being met

    • Poverty

    • Nutrition—being hungry

    • Safety—being scared

      • Black Latino and Native American students are also suspended and expelled at disproportionate rates.

      • School discipline of melonics at the pre-K level, as young as four years old, face unequal treatment from school administrators.

      • Black students accounted for 18 percent of the country’s pre-K enrollment, but made up 48 percent of preschoolers with multiple out-of-school suspensions.

      • Black students were expelled at three times the rate of white students.

      • American Indian and Native-Alaskan students represented less than 1 percent of students, but 3 percent of expulsions.

      • Black girls were suspended at higher rates than all other girls and most boys.

      • American Indian and Native-Alaskan girls were suspended at higher rates than white boys or girls.

      • Nearly one in four black or Native American boys with disabilities received an out-of-school suspension.

      • One in five girls of color with disabilities received an out-of-school suspension.

    • Access to—education, equity and opportunities

      • Black, Latino and Native American students have less access to advanced math and science courses

      • One quarter of the schools with the highest percentage of black and Latino students did not offer Algebra II and a third of them did not offer chemistry.

      • Less than half of American Indian and Native-Alaskan high school students had access to the full range of math and science courses, which consists of Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, calculus, biology, chemistry and physics.

      • Black and Latino students accounted for 40 percent of enrollment at schools with gifted programs, but only 26 percent of these students where in the gifted programs.

      • Black, Latino and Native American students are more likely to be taught by first-year or unqualified instructors than white students.

      • Black, Latino and Native American students attended schools with higher concentrations of first-year teachers (3 to 4 percent) than white students (1 percent).

      • Black students were more than three times as likely and Latino students were twice as likely to attend schools where fewer than 60 percent of teachers meet all state certification and licensure requirements.

    • Availability of—mental health care

    • Poor self esteem

  • Isolation and oppression socially, politically, economically, and psychologically

    • Learned helplessness and motivational oppression

    • Lack of validation

    • Lack of access

      • Black, Latino and Native American students have less access to advanced math and science courses

        • One quarter of the schools with the highest percentage of black and Latino students did not offer Algebra II and a third of them did not offer chemistry.

        • Less than half of American Indian and Native-Alaskan high school students had access to the full range of math and science courses, which consists of Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, calculus, biology, chemistry and physics.

        • Black and Latino students accounted for 40 percent of enrollment at schools with gifted programs, but only 26 percent of these students where in these programs.

      • Black, Latino and Native American students are more likely to be taught by first-year or unqualified instructors than white students.

        • Black, Latino and Native American students attended schools with higher concentrations of first-year teachers (3 to 4 percent) than white students (1 percent).

        • Black students were more than three times as likely and Latino students were twice as likely to attend schools where fewer than 60 percent of teachers meet all state certification and licensure requirements.

    • Dismissive attitudes or denial of real cultural and community issues and unmet needs

    • Lack of empowerment and self-determination that directly influences cause and effect

    • Degradation, lack of respect and stigmatization or acknowledgement of the person and their process

 

 

We all know that thoughts shape behaviors, and that our potential is heavily influenced by our history, community, family, culture and personal experiences. If we are to positively influence a student’s ability to meaningfully access their educational opportunities, education advocates must address the cultural needs of each individual and identify their unique educational needs. 

 

Melanics have been misled and mis-educated into believing that they are a minority that cannot succeed.3. This myth has resulted in the lack of self-determination and control of their educational processes and outcomes.  Melanic individuals and communities need to be supported in advocating for themselves so that they can work together and succeed in academics, and business. Individuals can change themselves, but as a community we can change the culture of success.


 

1-“Melanic is a term created, by Dr. Ayo Maria Gooden, Ph.D., ABPBC, LLC, Licensed Psychologist and Board Certified African Centered/Black Psychologist, to more accurately refer to people of many colors (Blacks, Native Americans, Indigenous People, Latinos, Hispanics, and Asians) and their unique ethnic, cultural, and personal perspectives.”

(http://www.doctorayo.com)
(http://www.ccmcaucus.com/Melanic-defined.html)
 
2 - Many of our students are actually experiencing PTSD vs. the more stigmatizing mental health disorder labels used to describe their behaviors or lack of motivation. They have the ongoing re-experiencing of racism or PTSlaveryD that impairs their “ability to capitalize on their own knowledge, information and learning clearly, coherently and independently on behalf of their own personal development; as well as that of their family and community.”
Our institutional infrastructures continue to exploit the poor for economic gain through mis-education, poor living environments, unhealthy eating habits, perpetuation of a lack of self-history, which leads to self-hate. This results in poor mental, physical and financial health and lack of skills to prosper in our society at large.(http://osirisinstitute.com/PTSD_Manuscript.pdf)
 
3- Melanics make up 90% of the world population and the “they cannot succeed belief” was historically designed to maintain their submission throughout colonization, slavery and displacements. It continues today.
 
Items in italic are from The Department of Education’s civil rights survey which examined all 97,000 public schools, representing 49 million students.
External Links - Retrieved June 12, 2017, from:
14-Disturbing-Stats-About-Racial-Inequality; 
https://www.thenation.com/article/14-disturbing-stats-about-racial-inequality-american-public-schools/
 
A Critical Examination of Anti-Racist Education;
https://web.archive.org/web/20070206153611/http://www.csse.ca/CJE/Articles/FullText/CJE19-4/CJE19-4-08Mansfield.pdf
 
Alliance for Equity in Higher Education;
http://www.ihep.org/programs/the-alliance.cfm
 
American College Personnel Association Standing Committee for Multicultural Affairs;
http://www.myacpa.org/sc/scma/
 
Anti-Defamation League Curriculum Connections;
http://archive.adl.org/education/curriculum_connections/
 
Begin to Read - Literacy Statistics
http://www.begintoread.com/research/literacystatistics.html
 
CCMC Community Advocacy Center Support Drive 
http://www.ccmcaucus.com/community-advocacy-center.html
 
Chicago Policy Review - Discipline and Punishment: How School Suspensions Impact the Likelihood of Juvenile Arrest   
http://chicagopolicyreview.org/2014/03/26/discipline-and-punishment-how-school-suspensions-impact-the-likelihood-of-juvenile-arrest/
 
Cumming-McCann, A. (2003). "Multicultural Education Connecting Theory to Practice."
http://www.ncsall.net/index.html@id=208.html
 
Don't get Twisted (radio show)
http://www.dgitwisted.com/
 
Guidelines for Identifying Bias in Curriculum and Materials;
http://www.safeschoolscoalition.org/identifyingbias.html
 
International Journal of Multicultural Education;
http://www.ijme-journal.org
 
Korean Association for Multicultural Education (KAME);
http://www.kame.or.kr
 
Miller, A. (2011). "Seven Ideas for Revitalizing Multicultural Education."
http://www.edutopia.org/blog/multicultural-education-strategy-tips-andrew-miller
 
Multicultural Education Pavilion;
http://www.edchange.org/multicultural
 
Multicultural Education Review;
http://kame.or.kr/eng/journal.html
 
NAACP - Criminal Justice Fact Sheet 
http://www.naacp.org/criminal-justice-fact-sheet/
 
National Association for Multicultural Education (NAME);
http://www.nameorg.org/
 
Prison Policy Initiative 
https://www.prisonpolicy.org/reports/rates.html
 
Safe School Coalition, The. (2003). "Guidelines for Identifying Bias."
http://www.safeschoolscoalition.org/guidelinesonbias-screen.pdf
 
State of the Unity Community Summit 
 http://www.ccmcsummit.org/
 
The Melanic Initiative - The Alliance and Partnership Ma'at Institute and CCMC
http://www.iammelanic.com/about-us.html
 
The Power of Words Curriculum;
http://www.nameorg.org/resources.php
 
The Shame of the Nation, The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America by Jonathan Kozol
https://facultystaff.richmond.edu/~bmayes/pdf/ShameNation_Kozol.pdf
 
Travis Smiley Report - Fact Sheet: How Bad Is the School-to-Prison Pipeline? 
http://www.pbs.org/wnet/tavissmiley/tsr/education-under-arrest/school-to-prison-pipeline-fact-sheet/
 
U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights - Civil Rights Data Collection: Data Snapshot
(School Discipline)
https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/data.html?src=rt/   
http://ocrdata.ed.gov/Downloads/CRDC-School-Discipline-Snapshot.pdf
 
UCONN TODAY (The Civil Rights Act of 1964 Revisited);
http://today.uconn.edu/blog/2014/07/the-civil-rights-act-of-1964-revisited/
 
West Virginia Board of Education (2006). "Multicultural Education in 21st Century Schools."
http://wvconnections.k12.wv.us/multiculturaled.html
 
 
 

 

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